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NWSA English II

Ms. Strahan's English II Class

Month

April 2017

A4

Please read on your own. You need to read up to page 89 in Monster, then answer the comprehension questions below. What you don’t finish you will need to finish as homework. Therefore, you need to finish your reading in class today and questions at home.

Please, please, please be on your best behavior. Have a great day and safe weekend!

Kind regards,

Ms. Strahan

Comprehension Questions
Introduction
1. What causes Steve to cry at night?
2. What details describe the setting?
3. How does the writer use details to create a mood or atmosphere?
4. Why does Steve decide to tell the story of his experience in the form of a movie script?
5. What is the significance of the following quote? “I’ll call it what the lady who is the prosecutor called me. Monster.”

Monday, July 6
1. What is the significance of “Fade in: Interior: Early morning in Cell Block D, Manhattan Detention Center?
2. What effect does the author create by using the Voice-over? “VO: Ain’t no use putting the blanket over your head, man. You can’t cut this out; this is reality.”
3. What is the visual effect of Steve’s opening credits?
4. What is the significance of the following quote? “There are also monsters in our communities—people who are willing to steal and to kill, people who disregard the rights of others.”
5. What is Kathy O’Brien’s response to Steve when he tells her he is writing this “whole thing down as a movie?” What does this tell us about her attitude towards him? (inference)
6. For what crime are James King and Steve Harmon on trial?
7. What is Sandra Petrocelli’s responsibility as Prosecutor? What is her opening argument?
8. What is Kathy O’Brien’s responsibility as Defense Attorney? What is her opening argument?
9. What is Asa Briggs’s responsibility as Defense Attorney? What is his opening argument?
10. Briefly summarize the testimony of Jose Delgado.
11. Briefly summarize the testimony of Sal Zinzi.
12. Briefly describe the flashback involving Steve and his friend Tony. What can we infer about Steve’s character from his actions in this scene?
13. What is the difference between the point of view of the journal sections and the point of view of the movie script sections?

Tuesday, July 7:
1. Why does Steve “hate, hate, hate” this place?
2. What is Bolden’s testimony and how does it advance Petrocelli’s case?
3. In the flashback scene with Peaches and Johnny, what are the characters debating?
4. How does Briggs try to discredit (make the jury doubt) the truth of Bolden’s testimony?
5. What are two dangers Steve and other inmates face at night in the detention center?
6. What does the flashback between Steve and Jerry reveal about the nature of the brothers’ relationship?

Wednesday, July 8:
1. What precaution do the prison guards take and why?
2. What is the significance of the following passage? “It’s funny, but when I’m sitting in the courtroom, I don’t feel like I’m involved in the case. It’s like the lawyers and the judge and everybody are doing a job that involves me, but I don’t have a role. It’s only when I go back to the cells that I know I’m involved.”
3. Considering your answer to question #2, why do you think the author chooses to write the trial scenes as a script and the prison cell scenes as a personal journal?
4. What internal conflict is revealed in the following passage? “I want to look like a good person. I want to feel like I’m a good person because I believe I am. But being in here with these guys makes it hard to think about yourself as being different. We look about the same, and even though I’m younger than they are, it’s hard not to notice that we are all pretty young. I see what Miss O’Brien meant when she said part of her job was to make me look human in the eyes of the jury.” (Conflict, inference, and characterization)
5. What does the following passage reveal about Steve’s character and about the setting? “I hope I didn’t shout out in my sleep. That would look weak to everybody. It’s not good to be weak in here.”
6. What is the testimony of Detective Karyl?
7. Describe Steve’s nightmare/fantasy sequence about Death Row. What does that scene reveal about his emotions and character?
8. O’Brien suggests to Steve that in the eyes of the jury he really isn’t innocent until proven guilty. What does she mean by this? (theme, character)
9. Compare and contrast Osvaldo Cruz’s behavior in the neighborhood flashback with his behavior on the witness stand. What do these behaviors reveal about him? (character)

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A2 April 28 Assignment

Hey guys! I am at a leadership summit today so you all will be dispersed. Here is your reading assignment and your classwork (homework if you don’t finish). You will need to read PAST PART TWO until you get to the Chapter titled, “The Attributes of Summer.”(Page 142 in the hardcopy version.) You will need to answer ALL QUESTIONS UP TO PART TWO. These questions are on a post below.

Let’s be real, I know most of you don’t do your assigned reading but I am reiterating that you have to step up your game this quarter. There are audio versions on YouTube, so you can listen while you look and follow along with the text.

Please, please, please be on your best behavior. My colleagues are doing me a solid favor by helping me out today, so I expect nothing but the greatest report about you guys.

Have a great day an safe weekend!

Kind regards,

Ms. Strahan

Junior and Senior Class List

Junior Class

B3 assignments

Do the pre-reading assignments. Copy down the character list on your own sheet of paper. Begin reading the “Day 1” reading and answer the discussion questions. I have extra copies of the book on my shelves on the side of the room. Someone start a check out sheet with book numbers and names and leave it on my desk! Love you guys! Have a great day!

B2 and B4 April 21 Assignments

Hey guys! I am out for a PD today so here are your assignments. Please be on your best behavior. I expect nothing but the best from you guys! Have a great Friday and a safe weekend!

-Strahan

Compare and contrast the two works below. You should write a one pager in Docs and share it with me.

Excerpt 1: From “The Book Thief,” by Markus Zusak
Summer came.
For the book thief, everything was going nicely.
For me, the sky was the color of Jews.
When their bodies had finished scouring for gaps in the door, their souls rose up. When their fingernails had scratched at the wood and in some cases were nailed into it by the sheer force of desperation, their spirits came toward me, into my arms, and we climbed out of those shower facilities, onto the roof and up, into eternity’s certain breadth. They just kept feeding me. Minute after minute. Shower after shower.
I’ll never forget the first day in Auschwitz, the first time in Mauthausen. At that second place, as time wore on, I also picked them up from the bottom of the great cliff, when their escapes fell awfully awry. There were broken bodies and dead, sweet hearts. Still, it was better than the gas. Some of them I caught when they were only halfway down. Saved you, I’d think, holding their souls in midair as the rest of their being – their physical shells – plummeted to the earth. All of them were light, like the cases of empty walnuts. Smoky sky in those places. The smell like a stove, but still so cold.
I shiver when I remember – as I try to de-realize it.
I blow warm air into my hands, to heat them up.
But it’s hard to keep them warm when the souls still shiver.
God.
I always say that name when I think of it.
God.
Twice, I speak it.
I say His name in a futile attempt to understand. “But it’s not your job, to understand.” That’s me who answers. God never says anything. You think you’re the only one he never answers? “Your job is to…” And I stop listening to me, because to put it bluntly, I tire me. When I start thinking like that, I become so exhausted, and I don’t have the luxury of indulging fatigue. I’m compelled to continue on, because although it’s not true for every person on earth, it’s true for the vast majority – that death waits for no man – and if he does, he doesn’t usually wait very long.
On June 23, 1942, there was a group of French Jews in a German prison, on Polish soil. The first person I took was close to the door, his mind racing, then reduced to pacing, then slowing down, slowing down…
Please believe me when I tell you that I picked up each soul that day as if it were newly born. I even kissed a few weary, poisoned cheeks. I listened to their last, gasping cries. Their vanishing words. I watched their love visions and freed them from their fear.
I took them all away, and if ever there was a time I needed distraction, this was it. In complete desolation, I looked at the world above. I watched the sky as it turned from silver to gray to the color of rain. Even the clouds were trying to get away.
Sometimes I imagined how everything looked above those clouds, knowing without question that the sun was blond, and the endless atmosphere was a giant blue eye.
They were French, they were Jews, and they were you.
________________________________________
Excerpt 2: From “Auschwitz Shifts From Memorializing to Teaching,” a 2011 article by Michael Kimmelman

Flowers for victims of Auschwitz, left in January during ceremonies marking the 66th anniversary of the camp’s liberation. Go to related article »Credit Kacper Pempel/Reuters
For nearly 60 years, Auschwitz has told its own story, shaped in the aftermath of the Second World War. It now unfolds, unadorned and mostly unexplained, in displays of hair, shoes and other remains of the dead. Past the notorious, mocking gateway, into the brick ranks of the former barracks of the Polish army camp that the Nazis seized and converted into prisons and death chambers, visitors bear witness via this exhibition.
Now those in charge of passing along the legacy of this camp insist that Auschwitz needs an update. Its story needs to be retold, in a different way for a different age.
…A proposed new exhibition at the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum here, occupying some of the same barracks or blocks, will retain the piled hair and other remains, which by now have become icons, as inextricable from Auschwitz as the crematoria and railway tracks. But the display will start with an explanatory section on how the camp worked, as a German Nazi bureaucratic institution, a topic now largely absent from the present exhibition, which was devised by survivors during the 1950s.
Back then they wished to erase the memory of their tormentors, as the Nazis had tried to erase them, so they said as little as possible in their exhibition about the Germans who had conceived and run the camp. They focused on mass victimhood but didn’t highlight individual stories or testimonials of the sort that have become commonplace at memorial museums as devices to translate incomprehensible numbers of dead into real people, giving visitors personal stories and characters they can relate to. Those piles, including prostheses and suitcases, also stressed the sheer scale of killing at a time when the world still didn’t comprehend, and much of it refused to admit to, what really happened here.
Photo

Efforts are underway to update the exhibitions at Auschwitz. Above, Piotr Cywinski, the director of the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum.Credit Piotr Malecki for The New York Times

…The new exhibition would go on to describe the process of extermination, leading visitors step by step through what victims experienced, and end with a section on camp life, meaning the “daily dehumanization and attempts to keep one’s humanity,” said Piotr Cywinski, the bearish, red-bearded 39-year-old Polish director of the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum.
“If we succeed we will show for the first time the whole array of human choices that people faced at Auschwitz,” he explained. “Our role is to show the human acts and decisions that took place in extreme situations here — the diversity of thinking and reasoning behind those decisions and their consequences. So, we may pose the question, should a mother give a child to the grandmother and go to selection alone, or take the child with her? This was a real choice, without a good solution, but at Auschwitz you had to make the choice.”
…The gradual passing of survivors has also meant that Auschwitz faces a historical turning point.
“Teenagers now have grandparents born after the war,” Mr. Cywinski noted. “This is a very big deal. Your grandparents are your era but your great-grandparents are history.
“The exhibition at Auschwitz no longer fulfills its role, as it used to,” he continued. “More or less eight to 10 million people go to such exhibitions around the world today, they cry, they ask why people didn’t react more at the time, why there were so few righteous, then they go home, see genocide on television and don’t move a finger. They don’t ask why they are not righteous themselves.
“To me the whole educational system regarding the Holocaust, which really got under way during the 1990s, served its purpose in terms of supplying facts and information. But there is another level of education, a level of awareness about the meaning of those facts. It’s not enough to cry. Empathy is noble, but it’s not enough.”
This is the theme to which officials here return often. Auschwitz, they say, must find ways to engage young people (some 850,000 students came last year), so they leave feeling what the director called “responsibility to the present.”

Once you are done begin reading The Book Thief. There is a link to a pdf text on the top of my wesbite labeled “The Book Thief Online Version.” Just read the prologue and answer the questions for the prologue below. Make sure your answers are complete sentences.

Reading Comprehension Questions: The Book Thief
(Please write on a separate sheet of paper. You will receive NO CREDIT if you write on this paper.)
Prologue:
1.) In “Death and Chocolate,” Death says he sees what before the humans?
2.) What/who is Death referring to when he says it is the “leftover humans?”
3.) How many times does Death say that he saw the book thief?
4.) Who stands beside the railway line?
5.) Why does Death linger at the railway line?
6.) Where does Death FIRST see the book thief?
7.) Where does Death SECOND see the book thief? What is she doing and who is with her?
8.) Where does Death see the book thief a THIRD time? What is she doing?
9.) At the end of this section, Death says that he carries certain stories around with him to prove to him that humans are what?
10.) In the first four sections, Death introduces himself and discusses the importance of colors. What are the 4 colors mentioned in these first four sections (in order)?
Part 1:
11.) On the train, Liesel has a dream, what is her dream of? Why is this significant?
12.) Who dies in the first section?
13.) What does Liesel find and take at the burial site?
14.) Why does Death attend the burial?
15.) Who are the Hubermanns? Where do they live?
16.) Give a description of Hans Hubermann. What are some hobbies he enjoys?
17.) Give a description of Rosa Hubermann. What does she do for work?
18.) What does Rosa call Liesel? Why do you think she calls her this name?
19.) Compare/Contrast the relationship between Hans and Liesel and Rosa and Liesel.
20.) Why is dangerous that Liesel has brown eyes?
21.) How does Hans comfort Liesel when she starts having nightmares about her brother?
22.) What did they discover about Liesel in “The Woman with the Iron Fist?”
23.) When Liesel turns 10 she is forced to join the _________________________.
24.) Describe Rudy Steiner.
25.) What is Frau Diller’s “one golden rule?”
26.) What is the “road of yellow stars?”
27.) Who does Rudy imitate that enrages his father so? Why is his father angry with him?
28.) After Liesel wets the bed, what is Hans reaction? What does he find in her mattress?
29.) Who teaches Liesel to read and write?
30.) What is the “smell” Liesel refers to as the “smell of friendship?”
31.) When forced to read in front of her class, what does Liesel do instead?

Part 2:
32.) What is the name of the second book Liesel steals?
33.) In the Prologue, Death tells readers Liesel will steal her first book from ice and her second book from fire. What is meant here?
34.) Who is “Werner?”
35.) What does Liesel mean she says, “There were not many people who could say that their education had been paid for with cigarettes?”
36.) Who does Liesel want to write a letter to? Be specific.
37.) What is Liesel’s birthday present to herself?
38.) Who comes to the Huberman’s house the day of the celebration for Hitler’s birthday?
39.) How is the relationship between Hans and his son? How is their relationship a parallel to Germany and its people at that time?
40.) Why does Hans slap Liesel? What do they do after the hit?
41.) Does anyone see Liesel pull the book from the fire?
Part 3:
42.) What is Hans reaction to Lielsel’s second thievery?
43.) Why does Hans go to the Nazi Party office and ask about his application and then purchase a copy of Mein Kampf?
44.) Who does Liesel think saw her take the second book from the fire?
45.) What does the mayor’s wife show Liesel and what is her reaction?
46.) What does it say about the mayor’s wife (who leads the town) that she aligns herself with Liesel, the girl she saw stealing books?
47.) What does Death reveal to us at the beginning of “Enter the Struggle?”
48.) Who is Johann Hermann? What has happened to him and how do we know?
49.) Rudy joins Liesel in her thievery but this time they are what kind of stealers? What did they steal and who from first?
50.) Rudy and Liesel share a happy moment in Nazi Germany, reminding us of the blend between lightness and darkness, what is this happy moment?
51.) What does Walter Kugler do for Max? What are some things he gives him? Why?
52.) Was Max German?
53.) Max says Mein Kampf “saves” him- how so? How is this ironic?
54.) How do we know Liesel has a sense of right and wrong and morality?
55.) Who is Arthur Berg?
56.) How do we know Liesel and Max will soon meet one another?
57.) Who is the “struggler?”
58.) Where does Max arrive at the end of Part 3?

April 20th A2

Please be on your best behavior. If I get a bad report there will be consequences. I’ll miss you guys! Have a great day!

The Evian Conference http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007698

The Voyage of the St. Louis http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005267

1. Use a political cartoon (Green Light Go, New York Times) about the Evian Conference. Create an editorial cartoon to reflect your reaction to the fate of the Saint Louis and its passengers or the results of The Evian Conference. (Go to the April 19th B2 post to look at the political cartoon.)
2. Define the term “bystander.”
3. Explain the purpose of the Evian Conference. Discuss events and results.
4. Discuss decisions made at Evian and Wannsee (You need to research Wannsee.).Why did the Nazis engage in mass murder? What events made such a project possible? How did the idea of using gas originate?
5. Describe the Voyage of the St. Louis. Voyage of the Damned is also a strong reference source that has survivor testimony woven into the historical events. Why didn’t the United States allow the boat to enter? What role did the United States Coast Guard play? (You will need to research in your groups.)
6. Evaluate the response or lack of response on the part of individuals and the world community to the plight of the Jews.
7. Explain the viewpoints of various bystanders and victims.

HOMEWORK: Research how individual and international efforts safeguard human rights. How does the world respond to human rights violations? How should the world respond to human rights violations?

April 19th B3

Pre-reading Activity ANTICIPATION GUIDE FOR MONSTER

Directions: Before you begin reading Monster by Walter Dean Myers, fill out this anticipation guide. These questions are designed to get you thinking about some of the themes, events, and ideas that are dealt with in the novel. After reading each statement, write whether you think that statement is true or false. Then write a sentence explaining why you believe this way.
1. Racism and prejudice are not problems today in America. __________
Explanation:
2. Every decision we make has a consequence. _____________
Explanation:
3. When on trial, a person is always considered guilty until proven innocent. __________
Explanation:
4. Monsters are not real. They are imaginary creatures. ________________
Explanation:
5. Peer pressure is always a negative or bad thing. ____________________
Explanation:
6. People are sometimes discriminated against because of their age. ______________
Explanation:
7. Only guilty people go to jail. ___________
Explanation:
8. Novels can only be told in narrative form. _______________
Explanation:
9. People who commit crimes come from bad neighborhoods and bad families or they have some sort of mental illness. ________________
Explanation:
10. Writing in a journal is a good way to express feelings. ____________
Explanation:


Write 3-5 sentences for each discussion question below.

Discussion question #1: What makes a person a monster?
Discussion Question #2: Who are some real life monsters? (Follow same procedures as above).
Prediction Question #3: The protagonist of the novel, Steve Harmon, is referred to as a monster by another character. Why might this be so? (Prediction).

Copy these vocabulary terms and definition on your own sheet of paper.

VOCABULARY LIST MONSTER
PART ONE (Introduction – Sunday, July 12th)
Objection—expression of opposition or disapproval
Overruled—the judge does not agree with the objection (therefore, the lawyer can continue with the comment or question)
Sustained—the judge does agree with the objection (therefore, the lawyer cannot continue with the comment or question)
Proposition—statement or assertion
Felony—a serious, often violent crime
Testimony—a witness’s statement under oath
Felony murder—a situation in which a person dies as a result of a crime being committed
Suspect—subject to or deserving of suspicion; a person whom prosecutors believe may be involved in a crime
Shackle—restraint, impediment, chain
Monster—inhumanely cruel or wicked person
Allege—declare, especially without proof
Prosecute—institute legal proceedings against
Prosecutor (District Attorney or D.A.)—the lawyer who represents the state and is trying to persuade the jury to find the accused guilty
Defendant—the person on trial, the accused
Defense—the lawyer who represents the accused and makes sure the defendant gets a fair trial; this lawyer usually tries to persuade the jury to find the accused not guilty
7/10 Chalk—rub, mark, draw, or write with chalk
Merchandise—goods for sale
Evidence—available facts determining truth or validity
Character—collective qualities that distinguish a person or thing; the “core” or personality of a person (Compare and contrast this with the definition of character as a literary element)
Fringe—outer edge or margin
Implicated—show to be involved in
Indulging—yield freely
PART TWO (Monday, July 13th – December, 5 months later)
Acquaintance—slight knowledge; a person you know only casually or slightly
Taint—spot or trace
Incident—an event
Perpetrator—person who commits a crime
Menace—a threat
Implicate—to show involvement in
Conviction—a decision or judgment in which the accused is found to be guilty
Conviction—a strong belief in something (check context clues to determine which meaning is appropriate)
Technician—a person skilled in a specific trade
Verdict—a decision in a court of law
Accusation—a statement charging a person
Transverse—cross
Consign—to assign; commit

April 19th B2 Classwork and Homework

The Evian Conference http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007698

The Voyage of the St. Louis http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005267

1. Use a political cartoon (Green Light Go, New York Times) about the Evian Conference. Create an editorial cartoon to reflect your reaction to the fate of the Saint Louis and its passengers or the results of The Evian Conference.
2. Define the term “bystander.”
3. Explain the purpose of the Evian Conference. Discuss events and results.
4. Discuss decisions made at Evian and Wannsee (You need to research Wannsee.).Why did the Nazis engage in mass murder? What events made such a project possible? How did the idea of using gas originate?
5. Describe the Voyage of the St. Louis. Voyage of the Damned is also a strong reference source that has survivor testimony woven into the historical events. Why didn’t the United States allow the boat to enter? What role did the United States Coast Guard play? (You will need to research in your groups.)
6. Evaluate the response or lack of response on the part of individuals and the world community to the plight of the Jews.
7. Explain the viewpoints of various bystanders and victims.

HOMEWORK: Research how individual and international efforts safeguard human rights. How does the world respond to human rights violations? How should the world respond to human rights violations?

Unit 4 Review Packet

Unit 4 Test Study Guide March 30

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